Archive for category: Local

Op Shop Ball 2016

2016-01-29 22.32.27HOPE4HEALTH’s annual Op Shop Ball kicked off 2016 in truly unique style. This year’s event was held at Helm Bar, Surfer’s Paradise, and attracted over 230 students from across many different health disciplines, all dressed to the nines in the best fashion Gold Coast’s Op Shops had to offer. As always, attendees went all out sporting outfits ranging from tennis gear and ballerina costumes, to dressing gowns and Hawaiian shirts, or gracing us with the presence of everyone’s favourite cross-dressing alter egos. Special mention must go to Meg Roser, Justin Weller, Tait Hearps & Jeremy Lynch, who were winners of Best and Worst Dressed Attendees. A fantastic night was had by all, both on the dance floor and off, and special thanks must go to Helm Bar and their Band for assisting us with a fantastic event.

local pic 3Overall, this year’s Op Shop Ball enabled us to welcome over 60 new members to the HOPE4HEALTH community and raised over $1300 for Radio Lollipop at the Gold Coast University Hospital - a charity which provides comfort, assistance and entertainment for children in hospital and their families. This is a great achievement which surpassed even our grandest expectations of the event and we look forward to seeing it grow even more next year!

Tyson Pardon & Tien Chen
Local Portfolio Coordinators

Op Shop Ball raises $1100 for Radio Lollipop

HOPE4HEALTH’s annual Op Shop Ball kicked off 2015 in truly unique style. This year’s event was held at Helm Bar, Surfer’s Paradise, and attracted over 200 students all dressed to the nines in the best fashion Gold Coast’s Op Shops had to offer. As always, attendees went all out sporting outfits ranging from tennis gear and wet suits through to hammer pants, Hawaiian shirts and fluorescent ball gowns or gracing us with the presence of everyone’s favourite cross-dressing alter egos. Special mention must go to James Harris and Tessa Wilton, winners of Best Dressed Male and Female, and Justin Weller, winner of Worst Dressed Attendee. A fantastic night was had by all, both on the dancefloor and off, and special thanks must go to Helm Bar and the David DeVito Band for assisting us with a fantastic event.

Overall, this year’s event enabled us to welcome over 60 new members to the Hope4Health community and raised over $1100 for Radio Lollipop- an international charity which provides comfort, assistance and entertainment for children in hospital and their families, including those at the GCUH. This is a great achievement which surpassed even our grandest expectations of the event and we look forward to seeing it grow even more next year!

 

 

 

Speech Pathology trip to Cherbourg – July 2nd 2014

On 2 July 9 final-year Master of Speech Pathology students, 1 health promotion officer and 1 speech pathologist from Deadly Ears, and 2 4th-year JCU speech pathology students (on prac in Kingaroy) visited the Aboriginal community of Cherbourg, specifically to organise activities with the children of the holiday care programme run by the Gundoo child care centre. The group goals that were identified were:

1. to gain a better understanding of Aboriginal culture and language.

2. to be able to provide a positive experience to the people of Cherbourg.

3. to establish and maintain relationships between the people of Cherbourg, Griffith University speech pathology, Deadly Ears, and Hope4Health.

4. to sharpen our clinical skills in relation to assessment and intervention with this population.

We planned 7 stations (5 for younger children and 2 for older children): nature walk, collage, making a library bag (with the community’s ear health message: “healthy ears hear better”), book reading (using “Budburra books” made by people in Cherbourg), making a banner (including a word cloud about ear health and the link to learning), cards and games, and creating a video of the day. These activities were based on the following aims:

1. They increased the awareness about ear health and its link with learning and school.

2. They involved talking and encouraged positive relationships between the students, children, and each other.

3. They involved celebrating and appreciating the community and their language.

4. They would result in the children having something to take home so that the conversation about the day could continue to parents and other family members.

5. They would allow older children to show leadership with younger children.

We were told that there could be 50-80 children from the ages of 4-16 attending on the day, so we really had no idea what to expect. When we arrived, there were approximately 20-30 children there, mainly ranging from 7-13, playing basketball and cricket in an indoor hall. We set up our stations and the day started!

This trip was much more challenging compared to the Teddy Bear Hospital trip. We were in a highly unstructured environment and as such it was difficult to engage the children at times. We had to be flexible and creative in order to provide activities and experiences for the children that we had on that day. At lunchtime, the children went home and we packed up and went to the community health centre to meet “Pickle”.

Pickle is a local elder who conducts ear checks and services all the schools in the local area – providing a culturally appropriate and relevant service. He showed us his state-the-art van and demonstrated the use of his equipment. After that we went to the Ration Shed Museum and learnt about the history of the Cherbourg settlement. At this time we also had the opportunity to meet with a speech pathologist employed by Queensland Health who spoke to us about her experiences in working in Cherbourg.

 

Overall we had a successful clinical skills trip measured by the positive reflections of the students and staff from Deadly Ears, the smiles on the faces of the children, and the fact that we have been invited to return to the community next year.

I’d like to share with you some quotes regarding what we learnt on this trip:

- “…for me it was that no matter how simple the activity may seem, any time sitting next to a child sharing in an activity (colouring in, craft etc) can be an opportunity for learning for both child and adult.”

- “I learnt a deeper understanding of being flexible, following the children's lead, and being relaxed but intentional about creating learning opportunities.  Despite knowing that we would need to be flexible and that things could change on a dime, I found that nothing went anywhere close to how I pictured it would.”

- “I also gained a great deal from just being in an indigenous community, learning from the children, listening to Pickle and the elders.  There were a few moments when I felt briefly uncomfortable, unsure of the culturally appropriate protocol; and I thought this feeling was probably one that many families feel integrating into predominantly white schools...  Overall, this experience has certainly assisted me with cultural awareness in my future practice.”

 

Louise Sadler

Speech Pathology Representative

IMG_2584 IMG_2570

 

SUP day! Stand up paddle boarding

The brainchild of our fantastic allied health coordinators for this year, the SUP day was a great way to hone those watersport skills and get involved with H4H. This event was purely to encourage inter-health discipline mingling and bring students together. Everyone knows that building networks with like-minded people is the first step to creating amazing future opportunities for collaboration!

We had a fantastic turn out of allied health and medical students who gave their best go on the water. The weather was absolutely perfect and even the May-temperate water proved too tempting to resist and we had a few jump in! We finished the day with a sizzling BBQ and sunset on the beautiful Currumbin Creek. What a way to spend a Sunday afternoon!

Check out the photos from the day! HUGE thanks to our allied health organisers, particularly our incredible Nutrition and Dietetics representatives Heidi and Ishtar who lead the day brilliantly. Looking forward to seeing this event become a regular on the H4H calendar.

See the Local page for even more great pics of the day!

 

SUP day 3 SUP day 2

Speech Pathology – Teddy Bear Hospital trip to Cherbourg

On 7th May, 5 final-year speech pathology students were fortunate enough to join a group of medical students delivering the Teddy Bear Hospital Programme to the children of Cherbourg State School.

We organised and ran the Otitis Media Station. This preventative health information is particularly crucial due to the high prevalence of otitis media in Indigenous communities, and, indeed, in Cherbourg. Otitis media has grave implications for children as fluctuating hearing loss results in difficulties for children in developing speech and language, and in turn, literacy.

Our station was very well received and the children were very responsive to our message. (Although I think they taught us a lot more than we taught them!)

After meeting with the Head of Special Education Services, we were invited to the pre-prep room where we had the delight of playing with the children. (They were shy for about 30 seconds and then we became human climbing frames!). By playing with the children, we were able to informally assess their speech and language. This knowledge and the relationships developed at Cherbourg State School will inform our future clinical skills trip to Cherbourg.

Overall, our trip to Cherbourg was positive and unforgettable, and it is my plan that Griffith University Speech Pathology, Hope4Health, and the community of Cherbourg will continue our partnership for years to come.

 

Louise Sadler

Hope4Health Speech Pathology Representative

10313589_763306800354399_4326461277356338636_n 10259972_763305337021212_7774885663339285444_n 1484323_763305407021205_3775244338478853711_n 10155513_763306767021069_7116035916628820724_n 10155353_763307693687643_7219602487313774635_n 10363869_763307667020979_5290872545020783503_n

H4H Op Shop Ball – supporting Radio Lollipop

Special thanks to the authors: Local Coordinators Al McCombe and Cam Harrison

HOPE4HEALTH kicked of the year in style at the 2014 launch party - the annual Op Shop Ball, held this year at Helm Bar. We're not really sure how to describe the style of most of our members' outfits, but they were stylish nonetheless. We doubt any of the clothing items had double-digit price tags, some fashionistas actually chose to accessorise their kits by leaving the price tags on the clothes. We saw everything from denim bras, faux cowskin vests, terrible wigs, even worse hawaiian shirts, and of course a few gorgeous cross-dressers. Thanks to Helm Bar for the live music that matched everyones mood and drew everyone to the dance floor.

Yet again, HOPE4HEALTH lived up to their reputation of combining good times with good deeds, with $600 being raised on the night. The proceeds are going to Radio Lollipop - an international charity providing care, comfort and entertainment to kids in local hospitals. With almost 100 new members as of midnight on the night, the HOPE4HEALTH family are off to a flying start in 2014.

Check out photos from the night on Hopeforhealth Harry's facebook page.

 

1795268_469239039844731_419356435_o

© Copyright - Hope4Health
paper for money effective academic writing